Critically review, select and apply, from alternatives, appropriate research methods in an ethical manner.

Purpose:
The purpose of this module is to enable students to acquire and develop a range of skills including transferable, personal, interpersonal, academic and subject specific skills that will enable them to succeed in their chosen field of study.

This will be achieved through students undertaking a research project.

Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this module students should be able to:
Knowledge and Understanding
⦁ Critically review, select and apply, from alternatives, appropriate research methods in an ethical manner

Cognitive and Intellectual Skills
⦁ Be able to present, interpret and evaluate data from a variety of sources.
⦁ Demonstrate intellectual openness and flexibility to new ideas.

Practical and Professional Skills
⦁ Produce an ethical piece of research

Key Transferable Skills
⦁ Reflect systematically on performance to further develop learning.
⦁ Demonstrate numerical and statistical skills
⦁ Use a range of specialist software

Indicative Content:

⦁ Understanding of research methods
⦁ Utilisation of primary and secondary data
⦁ Methodology including ethics, quantitative and qualitative analysis
⦁ Basic results analysis using statistical packages
⦁ Journal article writing
⦁ Self-assessment of skills development in relation to given criteria.

Scheme of Work:

1 Lecture Title: Introduction to the module
Lecture Content:
⦁ The content and assessment of the module
⦁ Science and the scientific methods
Seminar; journal use: Food and nutrient intakes of primary school children: a comparison of school meals and packed lunches. G.A. Rees, C.J. Gregory (2008) Journal of Human Nutrition and Diet, 21, p.420-427
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005). Chapter 1
Walliman (2011) p7-15
Independent Study: find a research article that interests you and bring it to class for week 2
Fine tune topic ideas
2 Lecture Title:Beginning the proposal: developing a rationale for research
Lecture Content:
⦁ Finding and using literature to establish aims/rationale/hypotheses
Seminar/Practical/Workshop etc.: Analysis of research papers
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005). Chapter 2 and 5
Walliman (2011) p42-51
Independent Study: Assessment work
3 Lecture Title: Being a critical researcher. Looking at ethics
Lecture Content:
⦁ Critiquing other research
Seminar/Practical/Workshop etc.: Searching for relevant articles
Reading: Journal articles specific to research interest
Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005) Chapter 2
Walliman (2011) 52-62, 78-91
Independent Study: Critique of article
4 Lecture Title: Planning your method: basic research designs
Lecture Content:
⦁ Research design, participants, tool, consent, procedure, design
⦁ Basics of the proposal
Seminar/Practical/Workshop etc.: Alternative ways of answering questions
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005). Chapter 4
Walliman (2011) p92-112
Independent Study: Assessment work
5 Lecture Title: Gathering information: Quantitative methods –measurement
Lecture Content:
⦁ Different types of measures
⦁ Questionnaires and surveys
⦁ Reliability and validity
Seminar/Practical/Workshop etc.: Experiencing questionnaires
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005). Chapter 11, 15
Walliman (2011) 113-127
Independent Study: Assessment work
6 Reading week – directed study: Literature review/ Complete a skeleton plan of the proposal up to and including the literature review section
7 Lecture Title:Gathering information continued: Quantitative and Qualitative methods – exploring through questionnaires and interviews; the data
Writing the proposal
Lecture Content:
⦁ Types of interviews
⦁ Interview skills
⦁ The proposal
Seminar/Practical/Workshop etc.: Interview practice
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005). Chapter 15
The proposal – Chapter 20
Walliman (2011) p128-145; 146-161
Independent Study: Quantifying qualitative data
Transcribe your interview; assessment work
8 Lecture Title: Questionnaire design, the proposal
Lecture Content:
– Types of question
– The proposal format
Seminar: Designing your questionnaire/research tool
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005), the proposal – Chapter 20
Walliman (2011) p146-161
Independent Study: Assessment work
9 Proposal – workshop
Workshop on data collection tools
10 Proposal – workshop
Workshop on proposal presentation progress including ethics forms
11 Proposal presentation assessments
12 Proposal presentation assessments
13 Lecture Title: Dealing with data
Lecture Content: What is your data, how to collate, using data filters
Seminar/Practical/Workshop etc.: constructing data collection methods for own research tool
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005). Chapter 6
Independent Study: Assessment work
14 Recap and what has been done and what needs to be done
Workshop on data collection tools in light of proposal feedback
15 EXAMS/ASSESSMENTS/TUTORIALS
1 Lecture Title: Data Analysis : Basic concepts in dealing with data
Lecture Content: How to present your findings, feedback on proposals
Seminar/Practical/Workshop etc: Presenting data
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005). Chapter 6
Walliman (2011) p146-161
Independent Study: Assessment work
2 Lecture Title: Interpreting results and making meaning from data
Lecture Content:
⦁ Understanding results in the context of the project
⦁ Writing up a research report
Seminar/Practical/Workshop etc: Relating results back to topic aim
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005). Chapter 20
Walliman (2011) p113-145
Independent Study: Assessment work
3 Workshop and tutorials and tracking of progress (data analysis linked to literature review & methodology, leading to conclusions and recommendations)
Independent Study: Assessment work
4 Lecture Title: Data presentation, introduction to the report
Lecture Content:
⦁ Expectations of the data presentation
⦁ Format of the data presentation
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005).Chapter 6, 20
Walliman (2011) p113-161
Individual tutorials and tracking of progress (title, aim, objectives, rationale finalised, literature review near completion, methodology validity and reliability, results, discussion and conclusion)
Independent Study: Assessment work
5 Reading week – directed study – produce research findings presentation
6 Lecture Title: Data presentation reminders, introduction to final report
Lecture Content:
– Expectations of the data presentation
– Format of the data presentation
Reading: Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005).Chapter 6, 20
Walliman (2011) p113-161
Workshop/tutorials and tracking of progress (data analysis linked to literature review & methodology, leading to conclusions and recommendations)
Independent Study: Assessment work
7 Research findings presentations
8 Research findings presentations
9 Lecture Title:Structuring the report
Lecture Content: Feedback from Presentations. Structure of the report
Title, aim, objectives, rationale finalised, literature review near completion, methodology, validity and reliability, results, discussion and conclusion)
Reading:Thomas, Nelson and Silverman (2005). Chapter 21
Walliman (2011) p146-161
10 Lecture Title: Your Report
Lecture Content:Final preparation for report
Individual tutorials and tracking of progress (title, aim, objectives, rationale finalised, literature review near completion, methodology, validity and reliability, results, discussion and conclusion)
11 Individual Research Report hand in
12 Tutorials
13 Tutorials
14 EXAMS/ASSESSMENTS
15 EXAMS/ASSESSMENTS

Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategy:

This module will draw on a wide range of learning and teaching methods appropriate to the nature of the student profile. A range of assessment methods is used within the module, including presentation and report writing.

Students will be required to attend timetabled lectures during Semesters 1 and 2. Students will be expected to undertake a large amount of work in their own time to prepare for their research project. Support tutorials will be conducted mainly in Semester 2 as students are moving into the data analysis and report write-up phases of the project.

The module will also be supported via the Moodle site. As well as being used to give students access to lecture notes and hand-outs, it is a primary means of communication between staff and students. It is also a key tool for online collaboration between students helping them to engage in effective group work and peer-to-peer support. It can also be used for secure electronic submission of coursework and for equally secure return of marked work and feedback.
Assessment Details:
Research Project (100%)

Students are required (individually, in pairs or in groups of no more than four) to conduct an research project. The assessment has two components:

PART 1: Research Proposal Presentations (30% – 10mins) Semester 1: Weeks 11 &12

These will take place before any work begins on data collection. They are designed to ensure that the research is upholding ethical standards and is both worthwhile and feasible. A grade will be allocated for each student and will represent 30% of the total mark available for the assessment.Where students choose to work in pairs, or groups of no more than four, tutors reserve the right to reduce individual grades, where it is obvious that disproportionate effort and/or understanding of the process has occurred, against the assessment criteria.

Each individual/group is required to present their research proposal to the year group. The presentation should last 10 minutes and should cover the following areas:

⦁ Aims, Objectives & Rationale
⦁ Literature Review (Chosen Research Area & Methodology)
⦁ Research Design (including ethical and practical considerations)
⦁ A copy of the research tool(s) to be used*
⦁ Completed Ethics and risk analysis forms to be submitted*
⦁ Data Analysis methods

Students may be questioned on any aspect of the presentation, by the lecturer or peers, to clarify any issues raised.

* Students will not be allowed to proceed with data collection without submission of research tool and ethics approval. Where a student collects data without research tool and ethical approval a mark of 0 will be recorded for the module. Students who fail the presentation proposal will be allowed to collect data and continue with their research project upon ethics clearance from the module leader

Assessment Criteria – Proposal Presentation:

The presentation provides students with the opportunity to be assessed on learning outcomes 1, 2, 3:

The presentation will be judged on the following criteria:

Criteria Weighting
Aims, Objectives & Rationale
⦁ Presentation sets out clearly the aims of the research
⦁ Objectives set out clear steps for achieving the research
⦁ A realistic rationale is provided in terms of the client group and personal career planning
⦁ Research shows originality of thought
15%
Literature Review
⦁ The presentation adequately reviews and presents critical analysis of the existing literature on the topic area to provide general and specific understanding
⦁ The presentation integrates different sources of information into a coherent argument
⦁ The literature review demonstrates where there is a need for further research
25%
Research Design
⦁ The method identifies a realistic way in which to achieve the aims of the research
⦁ The method is based on similar research in the field
⦁ The method is ethical and any ethical issues have been dealt with appropriately
⦁ Logistical issues have been considered
⦁ There has been a consideration of other methods and a justification for the chosen method
25%
Research tool(s) to be used
⦁ Reliability issues are being dealt with appropriately
⦁ Validity issues are being dealt with appropriately
⦁ Copies of the research tool(s)have been submitted
10%
Data Analysis methods
⦁ Is method appropriate for the type of data acquired
5%
Presentation style
⦁ Time adhered to
⦁ Clarity of voice?
⦁ Body language appropriate?
⦁ Confidence conveyed in the material and the worthiness of the project?
10%
The presentation
Ability to communicate in a clear and concise way and present the assessment in a structured manner and in the appropriate format using formal academic styles (contents page, appropriate headings, spelling, grammar, word processing)
10%
Referencing
Ability to use an appropriate level of Harvard referencing for written academic work and the inclusion of a suitable reference list with a range of references from a variety of appropriate sources.
10%
Grading Criteria:

90% – 100%

All elements are completed to an exceptional standard.
⦁ There is clear and detailed evidence of an extensive review/understanding of literature relating to both the research subject and the adopted methodology.
⦁ Critical analysis and inter-relating of theories are in place
⦁ There is an appropriate level of analysis built into the methodology.
⦁ The proposed investigation is well conceived and realistic in its aims and objectives with reference to practical examples where appropriate.
⦁ The presentation is professional in nature, points are made clearly and concisely being substantiated by appropriate use of support material
⦁ The presentation is very well supported by visual aids/supporting documentation.
⦁ An extensive reference list in correct format is provided and there is clear evidence of how this is utilised throughout the presentation.
80% – 89%

All elements are completed to an outstanding standard.
⦁ There is comprehensive evidence of an extensive review/understanding of literature relating to both the research subject and the adopted methodology.
⦁ Critical analysis and inter-relating of theories are in place
⦁ There is an appropriate level of analysis built into the methodology.
⦁ The proposed investigation is well conceived and realistic in its aims and objectives with reference to practical examples where appropriate.
⦁ The presentation is professional in nature, points are made clearly and concisely being substantiated by appropriate use of support material
⦁ The presentation is well supported by visual aids/supporting documentation.
⦁ A strong research base has been shown to be utilised in correct format with clear evidence of how this is incorporated throughout the presentation.

70-79%

All elements are completed to an extremely good standard.
⦁ There is comprehensive evidence of strong knowledge base for the review/understanding of literature relating to both the research subject and the adopted methodology.
⦁ Some critical analysis and inter-relating of theories is in place
⦁ There is an accurate use of analysis built into the methodology.
⦁ The proposed investigation is well conceived and realistic in its aims and objectives with reference to practical examples where appropriate.
⦁ The presentation is professional in nature, points are made clearly and concisely being substantiated by appropriate use of support material
⦁ The presentation is well supported by visual aids/supporting documentation.
⦁ Source material is used to effectively to support ideas and utilised in correct format with clear evidence of how this is incorporated throughout the presentation.
60%-69%

The majority of elements are completed to a very good standard.
⦁ There is evidence of good understanding of the literature relating to both the research subject and the adopted methodology.
⦁ Some critical analysis and inter-relating of theories is in place
⦁ There is an accurate use of analysis built into the methodology.
⦁ The proposed investigation is well conceived and realistic in its aims and objectives
⦁ The presentation is professional in nature
⦁ The presentation has coherent structure and is supported by visual aids/supporting documentation.
⦁ Source material supports most ideas and utilised in correct format

50%-59%

The majority of elements are completed to a good standard with a few shortcomings.
⦁ There is evidence of sound understanding of the literature relating to both the research subject and the adopted methodology.
⦁ Some critical analysis is in place
⦁ There is clear use of analysis built into the methodology.
⦁ The proposed investigation is well conceived and realistic in its aims and objectives
⦁ The presentation is mostly professional in nature
⦁ The presentation has a structure that may at times lack coherence and has some supportthrough visual aids/supporting documentation.
⦁ Some source material used to support ideas and utilised in correct format in the main
40%-49%

The majority of elements are completed to an adequate standard.
⦁ There is evidence of understanding of the literature relating to both the research subject and the adopted methodology.
⦁ The content is mostly descriptive
⦁ There is limited analysis built into the methodology but sufficient to show the necessary understanding.
⦁ The proposed investigation is adequately conceived and realistic in its aims and objectives
⦁ The presentation is mostly professional in nature
⦁ The presentation has a structure that may at times lack coherence and has some support through visual aids/supporting documentation.
⦁ Some source material has been used to support ideas but content at times is often unsupported by appropriate literature

30% – 39% – Fail

The presentation does not demonstrate an acceptable research proposal.
⦁ The knowledge base for literature relating to both the research subject and the adopted methodology is weak.
⦁ There is insufficient analysis built into the methodology to show adequate understanding.
⦁ The proposed investigation is poorly conceived and hence unrealistic in its aims and objectives
⦁ The presentation is not reallyprofessional in nature
⦁ The presentation has a poor structure that lacks coherence and has limited use of visual aids/supporting documentation.
⦁ Where literaturehas been used it is often irrelevant
20% – 29% – Fail

The presentation does not demonstrate an acceptable research proposal.
⦁ The knowledge base for literature relating to both the research subject and the adopted methodology is very weak.
⦁ There is insufficient analysis built into the methodology to show understanding.
⦁ The proposed investigation is very poorly conceived and hence unrealistic in its aims and objectives
⦁ The presentation is not professional in nature
⦁ The presentation has a very poor structure that lacks coherence and has minimal use of visual aids/supporting documentation.
⦁ Where literature has been used it is often irrelevant
To obtain a mark of 20%, the work must show evidence of a genuine attempt to engage with the assessment requirements and with the subject matter

0% – 19% – Fail

The presentation does not demonstrate an acceptable research proposal.
⦁ The knowledge base for literature relating to both the research subject and the adopted methodology is extremely weak.
⦁ There is insufficient analysis built into the methodology to show understanding.
⦁ The proposed investigation is extremely poorly conceived and unrealistic in its aims and objectives
⦁ The presentation is not professional in nature
⦁ The presentation has an extremely poor structure that lacks coherence and lacks use of visual aids/supporting documentation.
⦁ Little or no literature has been used and where it is incorporated it is mostly irrelevant
There appears to be no genuine attempt to engage in the assessment requirements and /or subject matter
PART 2: Presentation of Findings Semester 2: Weeks 7 & 8 and Individual Research Report Semester 2 Week 11 (70% – 2500 words)

Students must present their findings to the class and tutor. This will be assessed and feed into the final grade. During and after their presentation students will be able to receive feedback regarding the appropriateness of their analysis and presentation of data. This should inform their final research report submission.

The assessment is designed to ensure that individuals are given the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of the research process and the practical significance of their findings. Students are required to produce a written report of approximately 2500 words following the assessment criteria structure provided (see below). This will be worth 70% of the total mark available for the assessment and should cover a critical review of the overall research findings
Assessment Criteria – Findings and Report:
The findings presentation (maximum 10 mins) and research report provide students with the opportunity to be assessed on learning outcomes 4, 5, 6, 7.

The report will be judged on the following criteria:

Criteria Weighting
Presentation of findings
⦁ Presentation of quantitative and/or qualitative data
⦁ Interpretation of data
⦁ Ability to evaluate in relation to methods chosen
⦁ Ability to evaluate in relation to past literature 10%
Title and Abstract
⦁ Appropriate title
⦁ Appropriate abstract to include concise description of research and its outcomes 5%
Introduction
⦁ Topic introduced to include aim(s), objectives, hypothesis where appropriate and rationale for self and the industry
⦁ Use of appropriate literature 5%
Literature Review
⦁ Comprehensive review of the literature relating to your research topic
⦁ Logical and balanced arguments, grasp of key concepts
⦁ Arguments supported by appropriate evidence
⦁ Addresses the question, only relevant material to be included
⦁ Use of appropriate reference material and sources 10%
Methodology
⦁ Review of method used with enough detail to replicate the project
⦁ Evidence of how reliability and validity of the method have been considered
⦁ Ethical issues relevant to the topic addressed
⦁ Consideration of other methods and justification of chosen method 15%
Results
⦁ Results presented in clear and concise manner
⦁ Tables and figures presented in appropriate style with brief explanation
⦁ Statistical values interpreted correctly and explained and/or qualitative data presented and interpreted in a recognised manner 10%
Discussion
⦁ Results evaluated and discussed in relation to aim/hypotheses as appropriate
⦁ Results evaluated and discussed in relation to theoretical concepts and previous research as considered in the literature review
⦁ Results evaluated in relation to methods chosen
⦁ Limitations included 15%
Recommendations
⦁ Discussion of potential applications and/or future research
⦁ Identification of improvements that could be made to the investigative project
⦁ Appropriate recommendations provided for organisation/industry
⦁ Conclusion in place 10%
Structure
Ability to communicate in a clear & concise way and present the assessment in a structured manner and in the appropriate format using formal academic styles (contents page, appropriate headings, spelling, grammar, word processing) 10%
10%
References
Ability to use an appropriate level of Harvard referencing for written academic work and the inclusion of a suitable reference list with a range of references from a variety of appropriate sources. 10%
Grading Criteria:

90%-100%

All elements are completed to an exceptional standard.
⦁ There is detailed evidence of a critical understanding and application of the literature and adopted methodology.
⦁ The report shows detailed knowledge and critical understanding of the wider context and interrelationships that may exist.
⦁ Accurate and insightful presentation of data
⦁ Coherent arguments and ideas are presented
⦁ Recommendations are thoughtful, realistic and innovative, being well supported by the evidence presented.
⦁ The report is professional in nature with presentation of the highest standard.
⦁ The report has excellent structure, points made are clear and concise and the piece is very well supported by appropriate source material.
⦁ An extensive reference list in correct format is provided and there is clear evidence of how this was utilised throughout the report
80 – 89%

All elements are completed to an outstanding standard.
⦁ There is detailed evidence of a critical understanding and application of the literature and adopted methodology.
⦁ The report shows comprehensive knowledge and critical understanding of the wider context and interrelationships that may exist.
⦁ Accurate interpretation of data
⦁ Coherent arguments and ideas are presented
⦁ Recommendations are thoughtful, realistic and innovative, being well supported by the evidence presented.
⦁ The report is professional in nature with presentation of a very high standard.
⦁ The report has excellent structure, points made are clear and concise and the piece is very well supported by a strong research base.
⦁ An extensive reference list in correct format is provided and there is clear evidence of how this was utilised throughout the report
70-79%

All elements are completed to an extremely good standard.
⦁ There is clear evidence of some critical understanding and application of the literature and adopted methodology.
⦁ The report shows strong knowledge and understanding with some critical analysis of the wider context and interrelationships that may exist.
⦁ Accurate interpretation of data
⦁ Coherent arguments and ideas are presented
⦁ Recommendations are thoughtful and realistic, being well supported by the evidence presented.
⦁ The report is professional in nature with presentation of a high standard.
⦁ The report has clear structure, and source material is used effectively to support arguments and ideas.
⦁ A comprehensive reference list, in correct format, is provided and there is clear evidence of how this was utilised throughout the report

60%-69%

Elements are completed to a very good standard.
⦁ There is sound evidence of understanding and application of the literature and adopted methodology.
⦁ The report shows sound knowledge and understanding with some critical analysis emerging of the wider context and interrelationships that may exist.
⦁ Accurate interpretation of data
⦁ Coherent arguments and ideas are presented
⦁ Recommendations are thoughtful and realistic, being clearly supported by the evidence presented.
⦁ The report is professional in nature with presentation of a very good standard.
⦁ The report has clear structure, and source material is used well to support arguments and ideas.
⦁ A comprehensive reference list,mostly in correct format, is provided and there is clear evidence of how this was utilised throughout the report

50%-59%

Most elements are completed to a good standard.
⦁ There is sound evidence of understanding and application of the literature and adopted methodology.
⦁ The report shows sound knowledge and understanding of major issues with some critical and practical application of concepts and ideas
⦁ Interpretation of data is in place
⦁ Some discussion and interpretation of relevant ideas is presented but further development is needed
⦁ Recommendations are realistic, much being supported by evidence.
⦁ Most content is relevant
⦁ The report is professional in nature with presentation of a good standard though there are some shortcomings/lack of coherence.
⦁ The report has logical structure, and source material is used in part to support arguments and ideas.
⦁ A reference list is present ,mostly in correct format, and there is some evidence of how this was utilised throughout the report

40%-49%

Most elements are completed to an adequate standard.
⦁ There is evidence of sufficient understanding and application of the literature and adopted methodology.
⦁ The report shows adequate knowledge and understanding of major issues with some links of theory to practice, though the majority is descriptive
⦁ Some interpretation of data is in place
⦁ Discussion and interpretation of ideas areevident
⦁ Recommendations are presented, with some supportive evidence.
⦁ Content has relevance in the main
⦁ The report structure is used, with presentation of an adequate standard though there are some shortcomings/lack of coherence.
⦁ There is evidence of source material but it may not always be used to support arguments and ideas.
⦁ A reference list is present and there is some evidence of how this was utilised throughout the repo30 39%% – Fail

The research based assessment does not demonstrate an acceptable standard.
⦁ The report does not show adequate understanding and application of the literature and adopted methodology.
⦁ There is weak knowledge and understanding of major issues, content being descriptive only with key concepts omitted
⦁ Interpretation of datais unclear
⦁ Discussion, interpretation of ideas and recommendations are limited
⦁ There is a lack of coherence and relevance of content
⦁ The report structure used is poor
⦁ Source material to support arguments and ideasis missing/irrelevant in the text and reference list and/or used inaccurately

20 – 29%% – Fail

The research based assessment does not demonstrate an acceptable standard.
⦁ There is insufficient understanding and application of the literature and adopted methodology.
⦁ The knowledge baseis very weak and understanding of major issues are wholly descriptive with many key concepts omitted
⦁ Much material is irrelevant
⦁ Interpretation of datashows lack of understanding
⦁ Discussion and interpretation of ideas and recommendations, if present, are not written with understanding
⦁ There is a lack of coherence and relevance of content
⦁ The report structure used is very poor
⦁ Source material to support arguments and ideas is missing/irrelevant in the text and reference list.
To obtain a mark of 20%, the work must show evidence of a genuine attempt to engage with the assessment requirements and with the subject matter

0 – 19%% – Fail

The research based assessment does not demonstrate an acceptable standard.
⦁ There is no real knowledge or understanding of major issues demonstrated
⦁ There is no real understanding of key concepts or adopted methodology.
⦁ Much material is irrelevant, incorrect or omitted
⦁ Interpretation of data shows no understanding
⦁ Discussion and interpretation of ideas and recommendations if present are not understood, no critical thought used
⦁ Lack of coherence and relevance of content
⦁ The report structure usedand presentation areextremelypoor
⦁ Little or no literature has been referenced in the text or reference list and where it is incorporated it is mostly irrelevant/inaccurately used
There appears to be no genuine attempt to engage in the assessment requirements and /or subject matter
Submission Dates:

Part One: Research Proposal Presentations (30%)
Semester One, Weeks 11 and 12

Part Two: Research Findings Presentations and Individual Research Report
(70%)
Presentations: Semester Two, Weeks 7 & 8
Report: Semester Two, Week 11

Resubmission Arrangements: Please liaise with course leader

Teesside University Assessment Regulations
Important Regulatory Points
(A link to the full regulations can be found on the College Student Intranet)
All courses:
⦁ the pass mark for a module is 40% undergraduate.
⦁ work must be submitted for all the components of a module (failure to submit one part will lead to reassessment)
⦁ the maximum mark achievable for a re-assessed piece of work is 40% the pass mark for a module)
Submission of Assignments

If you are unable to submit an assessment/assignment/sit an examination on time, due to circumstances outside or your control, you should contact your module/course tutor at the earliest opportunity to discuss your difficulty and determine the best course of action. This may involve the use of one of the procedures below, provided that you have good reason and documentation to support your case. Extensions are only granted in exceptional circumstances.

Short Extensions must be obtained prior to the submission date. Extension forms can be obtained from Reception and must be signed and approved by either your module leader, course tutor or year leader. The authorised form is then submitted by you to Reception, you should retain a copy to submit with the work. Extensions are normally granted for a period of 5 working days. Working days include vacation periods but not Saturdays and Sundays or Bank Holidays.

Long Extensions: requests for long extensions must be submitted to HE Registry, Reception, B16 Old Building, and these will be considered in accordance with Teesside University procedures and regulations.

Mitigating Circumstances

Mitigating circumstances are defined by the University as circumstances outside of the control of the student that have significantly affected performance in any summative assessment. (In order to submit a claim for mitigating circumstances you must have submitted a piece or work or sat an examination – it cannot be used for non-submission).

Teesside University’s Mitigating Circumstances procedure can be found at: http://www.tees.ac.uk/docs/DocRepo/Student%20Regulations/Academic%20Regulations/Mitigating%20Circumstances%20Regulations.pdf

Mitigating Circumstances pro formas can be obtained from McMillan Reception or Academic Quality and Standards, B16, Old Building and the completed forms, plus any supporting evidence, should be returned to the above. Information and guidance is also provided on the College’s Moodle site.

Please refer to your Course Handbook for further explanation of the processes and note that it is your responsibility to notify and consult with your Course Tutor/Personal Tutor, and to apply and complete the relevant pro-forma if you consider that there are any mitigating circumstances affecting your performance in assignments and/or assessments.

Non-submission or late submission

If you do not submit on time and have no valid reason for this, the following will apply:-
⦁ late submission within 7 calendar days – will receive a maximum mark associated with the pass mark (40% undergraduate; 50% postgraduate
⦁ more than 7 calendar days late – the work will not be marked, and a zero mark assigned, n.b. in this case the Examination Board may decide not to offer you the opportunity for reassessment in a module in which you have not submitted.
Key Texts:

Bell, S.J. (2005) Doing Your Research Project, London, OU Press.
Thomas, J.R., Nelson, J.K. and Silverman, S. (2010) Research Methods in Physical Activity, (6th Ed.), Champaign, Il, Human Kinetics

Recommended Texts:
Armour, K and Macdonald, D. (eds) (2012) Research Methods in Physical Education and Youth Sport London, Routledge.
Bedford, D. & Wilson, E. (2006) Study Skills for Foundation Degrees, David Fulton Publishers, London.
Burgess, R. (2002) In the Field: An Introduction to Field Research, London, Routledge.
Gratton, C. & Jones, I. (2004) Research Methods for Sports Studies, London, Routledge.
Heaney, C.,Oakley, B. &Rea, S. (2009)Exploring Sport and Fitness. Work Based Practice. Routledge.
Hinton, P.R. (2004) Statistics Explained: A guide for Social Science Students.2nd ed. London, Routledge.
Lynch, C. (2010) Doing your Research Project in Sport, Poole, Learning Matters.
Nelson, L, Groom, R and Potrac, P (ed) (2014) Research Methods in Sports Coaching, London, Routledge
Oakley, B. & Rhys, M. (2008) The Sport and Fitness Sector. An Introduction. Routledge
Pitney, W.A and Parker, J. (2009) Qualitative Research in Physical Activity and the Health Professions. Champaign, Illinois, Human Kinetics.
Ryall, E. (2010) Critical Thinking for Sports Studies, Learning Matters, Exeter
Silverman, D. (2005). Doing qualitative research: a practical handbook (2nd ed.) London : Sage.
Thatcher, J. Thatcher R., Day, M., Portas, M. and Hood, S. (2009) Sport and Exercise Science. Learning Matters Ltd, Exeter:
Veal A J (2006) Research Methods for Leisure and Tourism, London,Longman/ILAM.
Walliman N (2005) Your research project, London, Sage.

Journals:

There are several journals that are applicable. Students should concentrate upon journals/magazines dealing with exercise, health and fitness. I believe you will get a better understanding of research methods by looking at journal articles to see their methods than by reading a lot on research methods without the context.

ACSM Health and Fitness Journal
Clinical Rehabilitation
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
European Journal of Sports Management
Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews
Health Promotion International
International Journal of Sport Nutrition
International Journal of Sport Psychology
Journal of Aging a Physical Activity
Journal of Applied Physiology
Journal of Applied Sport Psychology
Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism Education
Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine
Journal of Sports Management
Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Journal of Sports Sciences
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Nutrition & Food Science
Qualitative Research
QUEST
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Sport Psychologist
Sports Medicine
Therapeutic Recreation Journal
Women in sport and physical activity journal

Electronic Sources:

http://www.library.miami.edu/netguides/psymeth.html
http://www.mcli.dist.maricopa.edu/proj/res_meth/index.html
http://www.sportsci.org/index.html
http://www.statsoft.com/textbook/stathome.html
http://www2.chass.ncsu.edu/garson/pa765/statnote.htm
http://cne.gmu.edu/modules/dau/stat_idx_frm.html
http://socsciresearch.com/r3.html
http://webster.commnet.edu/writing/writing.htm
http://cne.gmu.edu/modules/dau/math_idx_frm.html
http://www.hlst.ltsn.ac.uk/gateway/gateway.html
http://www.psychstat.smsu.edu/sbk00.htm
http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/collections/statsbk/index.shtml
http://www.learnerassociates.net/dissthes/
http://www.aresearchguide.com/
http://sportsci.org/resource/stats/index.html

Ethical guidelines:
www.bps.org.uk
http://www.bacp.co.uk/research/e_g.html

This is a small selection of the available literature. The library is well stocked with books on research methods – please use them! Your supervisor will provide more specific guidance on appropriate literature and you will be expected to demonstrate familiarity with up-to-date journal material.
You are encouraged to make full use of your Athens account (group network training sessions can be arranged subject to demand).

It is essential that you make full use of the many electronic journals available. If you do not, you are unlikely to be taking into account a wide enough selection of up-to-date research. The OPAC catalogue and other resources can be accessed off-campus via http://library.bradfordcollege.ac.uk.
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⦁ To attend seminars having read the set material, prepared answers to any set questions and with a willingness to contribute to discussions.
⦁ To read widely from the references provided.
⦁ To read around the subject in specialist journals
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